Chattanooga Model Con 2019: It’s all about the intangibles.

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This impressive 1/48 Vindicator won “Best Aircraft” of 2019

Of the shows that I have attended, or attend regularly, Chattanooga has the most unique judging methodology. In most other shows models are entered into general categories (aviation, armor, ships, figures, cars, etc), then divided into sub-categories (scale, time period, type, etc), and then judged against each other, usually by a team of judges. After judging, the top three builds of each sub-category are given awards, then from those winners, the top build of each category is given a “best of [category]” award, then there is a “best of show” award chosen from those winners. For lack of a better term, this is competitive model building. It is sport for artists.

Chattanooga does it differently. Model Con begins like most other shows by dividing models into categories but then disregards all sub-categories. Each model within a category is judged by a three judge panel. Awards are given (or not) for each build insofar as that every build is ostensibly judged against a perfect version of itself, not against other builds. The judges are allowed to award 1-5 points for build quality (5 being “near perfect”) and 1-5 points for finish (5 being “near perfect”). Then, the judges are allowed, but not required, to give up to 1 point for “intangibles”. Intangibles, as defined by the club itself, are a “reward for extra effort for tackling what [the judges] know to be a difficult kit, or for adding a significant amount of extra detail, or for making significant corrections to an inaccurate kit…or for presentation…or for ‘something special’.” The three judges scorecards are averaged and an aggregate score is given that correlates to an award.

  • Gold: 9.8 to 11 points.
  • Silver: 7.89 to 9.79 points.
  • Bronze: 6 to 7.88 points.

The judges at Chattanooga, regardless of this scoring system, are therefore explicitly given the leeway to choose the kit that will win the “best of” category (requires an average of a score of 11 based on all three judges giving the build 5s for both build quality and finish but also all adding a point for “intangible”) based on their subjective knowledge of the kit’s construction, or difficulty. This is the only show where I’ve seen an attempt to quantify or qualify what is otherwise known as “judge’s discretion”.

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All of mine were gold, but none went to 11.

All that said, the most interesting thing about the Chattanooga format is that the scorecards are returned to the modeler as feedback. For each build you can see how the judge scored the kit on build quality, finish, and intangible, often with notes.

Where other model shows are competitive, Chattanooga is, when at it’s best, a clinic. Not only is it a great gauge of the quality of your models, but the feedback can help drive your quality to the next level. I’ve found that in general their scoring system is indicative of how models will place at other shows that I attend and therefore it is a good barometer of how my skills are evolving. I give them 1 point for intangible for that effort, but a 4 of 5 on the quality of their experience otherwise.

The only negative comment that can be leveled against the Chattanooga show is that it is very long. The show itself is a two day affair and registration cuts off at noon on the second day. It is typically well after 4pm the second day before the awards are given. In fact, by the time awards are announced many, if not most, vendors have even packed up and left. As a man who loves everything about the hobby, and who spends a great deal of time looking through the various vendors tables and other entries, this show wears me down to attend. I am very ready to leave when it’s over.

That said, the quality of the entrants was, as per usual, high. I spent a great deal of time perusing the and admiring many of the builds (check out my full album of the event here). Below are a few of the builds that caught my eye:

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I give the award for “Most Ambitious” to this impressive 1/32 B-25 with lights and a spinning prop.
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The award for “Hardest to Transport” goes to this movie quality Millenium Falcon in what I can only guess is 1/32 scale?
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This 1/48 Spitfire with invasion stripes, spot on weathering, and beer barrels, gets my award for “Historically Accurate Intangibles”.
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My award for “Best Finish” goes to this Ford and Trailer. I marveled at that for a long time, and I don’t generally give cars too much attention.

In all it’s another great effort by the Chattanooga club, and the participants. I am looking forward to attending the IPMS Nationals that Chsttanooga will be hosting in August. Let’s hope I can get my P-61 finished in time.

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